Worker Realization Model: Step Three – Training Pt. 2

Training pt 2

 

About a year ago, I posted a blog inspired by Kobe Bryant. Bryant retired as one of the most controversial and talented men to ever play in the NBA. In his final game, Kobe scored 60 points. In his career, he won five championships with the same team. Kobe was a force to be reckoned with on the court, making him the backbone of the LA Lakers for the entirety of his career. Love him or hate him, Kobe demanded attention with his skill alone. But the excellence that Kobe exemplified throughout his career does not happen on accident. Talent and gifts were activated when met with proper training.

Talent and gifts are activated when met with proper training. Click To Tweet

Bryant’s talent got him started, but natural gifts alone were not enough to make him an international icon. He has given interviews in which he explains his training methods. He watched hours of game times, spent an incredible amount of energy in the gym, and devoted his life to becoming the best ball player he could be. The training he committed himself to and participated in impacted not only his career, but his life as a whole. (more…)

Worker Realization Model: Step Three – Training

Training

 

I am so excited to discuss today’s step in the Worker Realization Model: Training. This is probably my favorite part of the process because this is the leader’s opportunity to truly adopt the new volunteer into the serving community. While the inspiration and discovery steps are incredibly important, the training step is your moment to impart instruction, values, and culture. Your team culture and values are the lifeblood of your ministry. No matter how amazing your new volunteer may be, they must truly become a part of the team to be effective. Training is the only way to bring them into the fold.

Your team culture and values are the lifeblood of your ministry. Click To Tweet

If the discovery phase is about helping the team to learn about themselves, the training step is about teaching your new volunteer about your team. What do you want them to know? What are the vital pieces of information they need to have to be successful? This is your chance to answer those questions. (more…)

Worker Realization Model: Step Two – Discover

Discover

 

If you’re just tuning in, we are in the middle of our Worker Realization Model series. So far, we’ve discussed volunteer motivation as well as the first step in this process, which is inspire. If you have missed any of our previous posts, you can catch up here. Today, we’ll be covering the second step in our model: discover.

For many of us, the idea of building relationships and learning about our volunteers is a vital part of the recruitment process. When we think about the word discover, we most likely think about trying to discern whether this person will fit in our department. Quite often we have our own internal checklist with which we judge prospective team members. I would argue, however, that discovery is less about what we want to learn about them, and more about what they need to learn about themselves. Instead of asking yourself if this person can accomplish the task you have in mind, seek to understand what makes your volunteer tick. Who they are is far more important than what you want them to do.

Every volunteer needs to learn who God has created them to be. It is your job as their pastor and leader to partner with them on that journey. To help them along, ask them these three questions: (more…)

Worker Realization Model: Step One – Inspire

Inspire

 

Over the last few weeks, we have laid the foundation for our Worker Realization Model. If you have missed any of our posts in the series, you can check those out here. Now that we understand volunteer motivation, we can move on and take the first step in the Worker Realization Model: Inspire.

Have you ever heard someone tell a story that moved you to your core? Perhaps you heard a testimony from a missionary that detailed the work they are doing in a way that not only captured your attention, but caused you to pull out your wallet and make a commitment to support them financially. I have had those moments, but I believe it was more than just their storytelling that impacted me. I was moved by their mission and inspired by their vision. I gave because I believed in what they were working towards. I wanted an opportunity to be a part of what God was doing in their corner of the world.

If we want to build healthy teams, we must first communicate a strong vision. I read an article recently that described a healthy vision as “one that focuses action, provides direction, and inspires your stakeholders in all parts of life to move in a direction you choose.” We may not have stakeholders, but we do have volunteers. Let’s take a closer look at what makes a strong vision. (more…)