Enemies of Growth: Ego vs Confidence

confidence

 

There’s a fine line between confidence as a leader and having a large ego. Ego and pride go hand in hand, while confidence is often associated with a clear vision.

Ego and pride go hand in hand, while confidence is often associated with a clear vision. Click To Tweet

Sometimes we mistake ego with confidence. If we truly believe we can do everything well on our own — that’s just how confident we are in ourselves!

But ego, not confidence, often leads to isolation. Most people aren’t excited to work with someone who thinks they know it all, and someone who thinks they know it all doesn’t make an effort to work with those people either.

But before I tell you how to combat the first enemy of our series, it’s important to understand whether or not you’re leading with confidence … or with ego. Be honest with yourself as you self-evaluate.

 

Symptoms of Confidence:

  • You seek out feedback from those around you.
  • Results are more important than who gets the credit.
  • Teamwork makes the dream work — no one gets anywhere in life by themselves!

 

Symptoms of Ego:

  • It’s hard for you to receive constructive criticism.
  • You wholeheartedly believe in receiving “credit where credit is due.”
  • You prefer working alone — it’s more efficient, and it usually gets done the ‘right’ way.

In addition to my list, here are six ego-driven habits according to a Fast Company article:

  • You listen to advice but rarely follow it.
  • You never look for flaws (in your own work).
  • You try to do everything by yourself.
  • You see some things as beneath you.
  • You keep going, even though you’re wrong.
  • You alienate people over time, but aren’t sure why.

Do any of these habits sound familiar? If so, it might be time to reevaluate some of the prideful habits you’ve developed. Below is a list of things you can try to work on this week. Unfortunately, bad habits don’t just go away — but they can be exchanged for better ones!

Unfortunately, bad habits don’t just go away — but they can be exchanged for better ones! Click To Tweet

Alleviating Prideful Habits:

  1. Start taking notice of the people working around you. Who’s one person you can encourage this week? Make sure your affirmation is specific.
  1. Start welcoming a little more collaboration in your life: Ask for someone else’s opinion on a project; recognize any good advice and make an effort to implement it, even if it’s something small.
  1. Ask a boss or peer — someone you trust — for honest feedback … what’s one thing they think you can work on? Make a plan of action based on their feedback.

 

What’s your pride alleviation plan? Do you have anything to add to the list? Take each task one at a time, and push through even if it’s counterintuitive or makes you uncomfortable. In the long run, you’ll be better for it — and so will your relationships!

 

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