Duke’s Weekly Reads: Habit

Habit

 

Last week, we posted an article relative to shifting the paradigm in our lives. In that article, we mentioned how critical the formation and consistent execution of good habits were to the shifting of our life’s paradigms. Below you will find some of the articles I have read this week regarding habit formation. Remember, your habits will determine your paradigms.

If you gain any vaue out of what we provide, would you send us a quick note? We love to hear from our readers and would love to hear from you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s reads!

 

What the Research on Habit Formation Reveals About our Willpower and Overall Well-Being

In the past decade, there has been a lot of fascinating academic research conducted around habit formation and willpower. By examining things like how smokers quit, why student perform well and how New Year’s resolvers stay on track, researchers are starting to piece together the answers to how we can build lasting habits and improve our ability to resist temptation.

One surprising result is this: to improve your overall well-being, start a new regular habit. Pretty much any positive habit will do. Read More

What the Research on Habit Formation Reveals About Willpower (And How You Can Apply it to Your Life)

In the past decade, there has been a lot of fascinating academic research conducted around habit formation and willpower. By examining things like how smokers quit, why student perform well, and how New Year’s resolvers stay on track, researchers are starting to piece together the answers to how we can build lasting habits and improve our ability to resist temptation. One surprising result is this: to improve your overall well-being, start a new regular habit. Pretty much any positive habit will do.

For details on how this really worked, I have always been extremely curious. I’ve dug deep into the research and to find out more: Read More

 

How Long Does It Actually Take to Form a New Habit? (Backed by Science)

Maxwell Maltz was a plastic surgeon in the 1950s when he began noticing a strange pattern among his patients.

When Dr. Maltz would perform an operation — like a nose job, for example — he found that it would take the patient about 21 days to get used to seeing their new face. Similarly, when a patient had an arm or a leg amputated, Maltz noticed that the patient would sense a phantom limb for about 21 days before adjusting to the new situation.

These experiences prompted Maltz to think about his own adjustment period to changes and new behaviors, and he noticed that it also took himself about 21 days to form a new habit. Maltz wrote about these experiences and said, “These, and many other commonly observed phenomena tend to show that it requires a minimum of about 21 days for an old mental image to dissolve and a new one to jell.” Read More 

The Golden Rule of Habit Change

In the last decade, our understanding of the neurology of habit formation has been transformed.

A quiet revolution has upended our concept of the way patterns work within our lives, societies, and organizations. And much of what we have learned has come from studying the simplest of habits — such as why people bite their nails.

In the summer of 2006, for instance, a 24-year-old graduate student named Mandy walked into the counseling center at Mississippi State University. For most of her life, Mandy had bitten her nails, gnawing them until they bled.

Lots of people bite their nails. For chronic nail biters, however, it’s a problem of a different scale. Read More